21-Day Meditation Challenge Artwork
Season 1 - Episode 26

Day 14: Internalize

20 min - Practice
24 likes
Loading...

Description

Similar to yesterday, we continue to explore japa mala meditation, today, with the mantra Hamsa. Pause and notice the effects.

Although a mala is not required for this practice, it may be helpful to have one.

What You'll Need: No props needed

Transcript

Read Full Transcript

So here we are for meditation number 14. So really just repeating what we did yesterday except I want you to compare and contrast mantras. So we use the mala so hum. Today let's try hum sa. Same process hopefully not feeling too challenging with the movement of your hands and the beads but let's let's keep working with it. It may take you a while to really get the rhythm and to feel comfortable with kind of managing the mala and staying on mantra. So align your body. Always always it's key to go through that physical process not only does it land you mentally but it sets you up with good alignment. So closing the eyes and beginning that that journey that mental journey. Make any required movements to feel good here. Pelvis spine creating balance between the front body and the back body shoulder girdle. And then there is the effort to sit well to sit tall but that's really the only physical effort. Everything else can relax. Letting go of tension. Letting go of even just the sense of needing to effort which sometimes is very challenging. Giving yourself the space to get softer and softer here. And then having that check in with yourself. Such a good way to mark how you are as you begin and what's true when you complete.

And then becoming aware of your breath. Breath natural and easy, unrestrained, uncontrolled. Just moving effortlessly. And let's move into the use of the mala. So starting with the first bead. First two fingers thumb and as you're ready to shift into the the use of the mantra hamsa. And then shifting and moving hamsa. Hamsa. That I am. And we'll continue moving into silence as we go hamsa. And we'll continue moving as we go hamsa. And sometimes you might notice that you're beginning to speed up a little bit. Almost moving into autopilot with the mantra. Notice when that happens and catch yourself. Slow it down.

Remember that feeling tone. Connecting you through to the tradition thousands of years of practice. So there's more of a pause and more of an emphasis, a presence as you repeat the mantra. So slowing it down. Just as the mind tends to speed up you might find you're moving more quickly. Slow it down. Hamsa. And we'll continue moving into silence as we go hamsa. And we'll continue moving into silence as we go hamsa. And we'll continue moving into silence as we go hamsa. And if you come to completion, the first cycle, just go ahead and keep going.

Moving around the beads, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa. Moving around the beads, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa. Moving around the beads, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa. Moving around the beads, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa. Moving around the beads, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa.

Moving around the beads, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa. And remember every so often, come back to your body, adjust if you need to, let go of any tension, you don't start to sink and kind of lose your good alignment, and then keep moving along the mala, hamsa, hamsa, that I am. Moving around the beads, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, And again, if you find yourself completing the second cycle on your mala, then just keep going. Skip to that first bead, hamsa, hamsa. For our purposes, we're committing to 21 minutes.

But eventually, if you're really using the japa practice, you might commit to several cycles a day. However many times around you want to go, depending on the length, too, of your mantra. Stay steady on the mantra, just maybe five more minutes. Moving bead to bead, hearing that inner sound, feeling tone. So it's not autopilot, there's a feeling tone as you chant the mantra, hamsa, hamsa.

And again, keep going, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa. And again, keep going, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa, hamsa. And last moments here, remember, stay tall, stay tension free, stay on the mantra, keep going until we come to a full close. And again, keep going until we come to a full close. And again, keep going until we come to a full close.

And again, keep going until we come to a full close. Now releasing the technique, you can just gently allow your mala to slide down and stay internal, pay attention second day of using the mala, noticing the effects, having a moment to pause and really feel the results of this particular meditation. And then let's bring it to a close. Hands together at the heart. Namaste.

And thank you, thank you for meditating with me.

Comments

Curtis Hamilton
These meditation challenges have helped me to get back to where I look forward to my daily meditation. This is my 4th meditation period today. But this one is the only one that I used the mala and the mantra together and it is the only one today where I felt my heartbeat????
Nikki Estrada
I have always found Hamsa to be a difficult mantra for me for some reason. I tried it again today with an open mind & it's a no go!!! Makes me unsettled. It's not a good one for me! Is anyone else having a similar experience?
Curtis Hamilton
Maybe I am strange but it is my favorite.
Curtis Hamilton
I am getting ready to do my 19th day on the 21 Day Challenge and after that I will meditate after again later with the mantra Hamsa. I will report back later with my experience.
Kira Sloane
I love that you, Nikki Estrada, and Curtis have such different experiences with this meditation! It so shows how wonderful it is that you offered us so many different techniques with which we could play.
Curtis Hamilton
Just redid 21 Day Challenge Day 11 using the mantra Hamsa. It is definitely my favorite so far. I went to meditate one Saturday after day 11 but forgot to take my mala beads. But I did remember the mantra Hamsa so I meditated with it. It was the best meditation experience for me there at that studio. I am so glad you are showing us many different meditation techniques. I am now practicing Taijiquan. I will have to learn some Daoist Meditation techniques. Don't know what the difference is between the techniques I have learned so far and Daoists Meditation but looking forward to it. Again thank you for showing us so much.
Debra D
3 people like this.
It’s so interesting to hear you say that hamsa makes you feel unsettled, Nikki, because I had a similar experience with it today. Yesterday felt deep and calm, but that hamsa kept flying around my mind today and would not settle on its perch. Maybe it’s because of the energy of the day... it’s very windy today where I am, and also the last day of the year - and also, I meditated later than usual, not in the silence of the early morning. Anyway, onwards... πŸŒ€πŸŒˆ And Happy New Year πŸŽ† Thank you for your guidance πŸ§—πŸ»β€β™€οΈ
Matthew
many thanks for this. did the practice just now - seemed ok to me - felt more grounded afterwards. maybe even a little easier than the soham. not sure why.
Matthew
i did this practice again just now - when it seemed a bit mechanical after several minutes, your prompt regards infusing the words with a 'feeling tone' was very useful - the practice slowed down, warmed up and i settled down! many thanks.
Glenford N
My practice seems to getting smoother easier and more graceful. Felt I was surrounded by gentle energy which took the form of red orange and purple lights. I rested in that glow and the mantra just followed. Made a few shifts to make me comfortable and continued to the end relaxed focused and at peace. Namaste.
1-10 of 17

You need to be a subscriber to post a comment.

Please Log In or Create an Account to start your free trial.

Footer Yoga Anytime Logo

Just Show Up

Over 2,900 yoga and meditation practices to bring you Home.

15-Day Free Trial